Fire Safety Discussion Points
Use the following fire safety and prevention information to lead discussions.

Control Kids' Access to Fire

  • Keep all matches and lighters out of the hands of children. If possible, keep these sources of fire in locked drawers. Consider buying only "child-proof" lighters—but be aware that no product is completely child-proof.
  • Children as young as two years old can strike matches and start fires.
  • Never leave children unattended near operating stoves or burning candles, even for a short time.
  • Teach children not to pick up matches or lighters they may find. Instead, they should tell an adult immediately.


Fire Safety at Home

  • Smoke alarms should be installed on every level of the home, especially near sleeping areas.
  • Smoke alarms should be kept clean of dust by regularly vacuuming over and around them.
  • Replace batteries in smoke alarms at least once a year. And replace the entire unit after ten years of service, or as the manufacturer recommends.
  • Families should plan and practice two escape routes from each room of their home.
  • Regularly inspect the home for fire hazards.
  • If there are adults in the home who smoke, they should use heavy safety ashtrays and discard ashes and butts in metal, sealed containers or the toilet.
  • If there is a fireplace in the home, the entire opening should be covered by a heavy safety screen. The chimney should be professionally inspected and cleaned annually.
  • Children should cook only under the supervision of an adult or with their permission.
  • Children should never play with electrical cords or electrical sockets. They should ask adults for help plugging in equipment.
  • Children should stay away from radiators and heaters, and they should be taught that these devices are not toys. Young children in particular must be taught not to play with or drop anything into space heaters. Nothing should be placed or stored on top of a heater.
  • Pots on stovetops should always have their handles turned toward the center of the stove, where children cannot reach up and pull or knock them off.
  • Teach children to turn off lights, stereos, TVs, and other electrical equipment when they are finished using them. In the case of room heaters, children should ask an adult to turn it off when the room will be empty.
  • Children should never touch matches, lighters, or candles. If they find matches or lighters within reach, they should ask an adult to move them
  • No one should stand too close to a fireplace or wood stove or other types of heaters, where clothes could easily catch fire.


Warning Signs

  • Evidence of fire play, such as burnt matches, clothes, paper, toys, etc., or if you smell smoke in hair or clothes.
  • Inappropriate interest in firefighters and/or fire trucks, such as frequent, improper calls to the fire department or 9-1-1.
  • Child asks or tries to light cigarettes or candles for you or other adults.
  • Matches or lighters in their pockets or rooms.


Control Curiosity

  • Talk to your child or students in a calm, assured manner about fire safety.
  • Consider visiting a fire station if children are very interested in firefighting and/or fire trucks or ask a firefighter to visit your classroom. Have the firefighter talk about his/her job and the dangers of fire.
  • For parents: Create opportunities for learning about fire safety at home. For example, when you cook, let your child get the pot holder for you; when you use the fireplace, let your child bring you the wood or tools; if you use candles, let the child check to make sure the candle holder fits snugly; and when you change or test the batteries in your smoke alarms, ask the child to help you.


What to Do if You Suspect Your Student/Child Is Playing with Fire?

  • Talk to the child about his or her actions. Explain again that fire is a tool for use only by adults, and that it is very dangerous for children.
  • Many schools, fire departments and law enforcement agencies have programs for children who are inappropriately interested in fire or who have set fires.


Learn About Smoke Alarms

  • Why should I have a working smoke alarm?


  • A properly installed and maintained smoke alarm is the only thing in your home that can alert you and your family to a fire 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Whether you’re awake or asleep, a working smoke alarm is constantly on alert, scanning the air for fire and smoke.


  • According to the National Fire Protection Association, almost two-thirds of home fire deaths resulted from fires in properties without working smoke alarms. A working smoke alarm significantly increases your chances of surviving a deadly home fire.


  • What types of smoke alarms are available?


  • There are many different brands of smoke alarms available on the market, but they fall under two basic types: ionization and photoelectric.


  • It cannot be stated definitively that one is better than the other in every fire situation that could arise in a residence. Because both ionization and photoelectric smoke alarms are better at detecting distinctly different, yet potentially fatal fires, and because no one can predict what type of fire might start in a home, the USFA recommends that every residence and place where people sleep be equipped with:


  • Both ionization AND photoelectric smoke alarms, OR
  • dual sensor smoke alarms, which contain both ionization and photoelectric smoke sensors


  • In addition to the basic types of alarms, there are alarms made to meet the needs of people with hearing disabilities. These alarms may use strobe lights that flash and/or vibrate to assist in alerting those who are unable to hear standard smoke alarms when they sound.


  • What powers a smoke alarm?


  • Smoke alarms are powered by battery or they are hardwired into the home’s electrical system. If the smoke alarm is powered by battery, it runs on either a disposable 9-volt battery or a non-replaceable 10-year lithium (“long-life”) battery. A backup battery is usually present on hardwired alarms and may need to be replaced.

  • These batteries must be tested on a regular basis and, in most cases, should be replaced at least once each year (except for lithium batteries). See the Smoke Alarm Maintenance section for more information.


  • Are smoke alarms expensive?


  • Smoke alarms are not expensive and are worth the lives they can help save. Ionization and photoelectric smoke alarms cost between $6 and $20. Dual sensor smoke alarms cost between $24 and $40.


  • Some fire departments offer reduced price, or even free, smoke alarms. Contact your local fire department’s non-emergency phone number for more information.


  • Install smoke alarms in key areas of your home


  • Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement. Many fatal fires begin late at night or early in the morning, so the U.S. Fire Administration recommends installing smoke alarms both inside and outside of sleeping areas.


  • Since smoke and many deadly gases rise, installing your smoke alarms at the proper level will provide you with the earliest warning possible. Always follow the manufacturer’s installation instructions.


  • Some fire departments will install battery-operated smoke alarms in your home at no cost. Contact your local fire department’s non-emergency phone number for more information.


  • Hardwired smoke alarms should be installed by a qualified electrician.


Smoke alarm maintenance

  • Is your smoke alarm still working? Smoke alarms must be maintained! A smoke alarm with a dead or missing battery is the same as having no smoke alarm at all.
  • A smoke alarm only works when it is properly installed and maintained. Depending on how your smoke alarm is powered (9-volt, 10-year lithium, or hardwired), you’ll have to maintain it according to manufacturer’s instructions. General guidelines for smoke alarm maintenance:
  • Smoke alarm powered by a 9-volt battery


Test the alarm monthly.

  • Replace the batteries at least once per year.
  • The entire smoke alarm unit should be replaced every 8-10 years.
  • Smoke alarm powered by a 10-year lithium (or “long life”) battery


Test the alarm monthly.

  • Since you cannot (and should not) replace the lithium battery, the entire smoke alarm unit should be replaced according to manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Smoke alarm that is hardwired into the home’s electrical system


Test the alarm monthly.

  • The backup battery should be replaced at least once per year.
  • The entire smoke alarm unit should be replaced every 8-10 years.


Never disable a smoke alarm while cooking!


  • A smoke alarm is just doing its job when it sounds while you’re cooking or taking a shower with lots of steam.
  • If a smoke alarm sounds while you’re cooking or taking a shower with lots of steam, do not remove the battery. You should:
  • Open a window or door and press the “hush” button,
  • Wave a towel at the alarm to clear the air, or
  • Move the entire alarm several feet away from the location.


Disabling a smoke alarm or removing the battery can be a deadly mistake!

  • Smoke alarm that is hardwired into the home’s electrical system


Learn About Fire Escape Plans

In the event of a fire, remember that every second counts, so you and your family must always be prepared. Escape plans help you get out of your home quickly. In less than 30 seconds, a small flame can get completely out of control and turn into a major fire. It only takes minutes for a house to fill with thick black smoke and become engulfed in flames.

Prepare and practice your fire escape plan twice a year with everyone in your household, including children and people with disabilities. It's also a good idea to practice your plan with overnight guests. Some tips to consider when preparing your escape plan include:

  • Draw a map of each level of your home and show all doors and windows. Find two ways to get out of each room. Make sure all doors and windows that lead outside open easily.
  • Only purchase collapsible escape ladders evaluated by a recognized testing laboratory. Use the ladder only in a real emergency.
  • Teach children how to escape on their own in case you cannot help them.
  • Have a plan for everyone in your home who has a disability.
  • Practice your fire escape plan at night and during the daytime.



Security Bars Require Special Precautions

  • Security bars may help to keep your family safe from intruders, but they can also trap you inside in the event of a deadly fire! Windows and doors with security bars must have quick release devices to allow them to be opened immediately in an emergency. Make sure everyone in the family understands and practices how to properly operate and open locked or barred doors and windows.

Immediately Leave the Home

  • When a fire occurs, get out fast: you may only have seconds to escape safely. Take the safest exit route, but if you must escape through smoke, remember to crawl low, under the smoke and keep your mouth covered. The smoke contains toxic gases, which can disorient you or, at worst, overcome you.


Never Open Doors that are Hot to the Touch

  • When you come to a closed door, feel the doorknob and door to make sure that fire is not on the other side. If either is hot, leave the door closed and use your secondary escape route. If the door feels cool, open it slowly. Be ready to shut it quickly if heavy smoke or fire is present.


  • If you can't get out, close the door and cover vents and cracks around doors to keep the smoke out. Call 9-1-1 or your local emergency number. Say where you are and signal for help at the window with a light-colored cloth or a flashlight.


Designate a Meeting Place Outside and Take Attendance

  • Designate a meeting location a safe distance in front of your home. For example, meet under a specific tree or at the end of the driveway or front sidewalk to make sure everyone has gotten out safely and no one will be hurt looking for someone who is already safe. Make sure everyone in your home knows how to call 9-1-1 or your local emergency number and that your house number can be seen day or night from the street.


Once Out, Stay Out!

  • Remember to escape first and then notify the fire department using the 9-1-1 system or proper local emergency number in your area. Never go back into a burning building for any reason. Teach children not to hide from firefighters. If someone is missing, or pets are trapped inside your home, tell the firefighters right away. They are equipped to perform rescues safely.


How Fire-Safe Is Your Home?

  • You won’t know until you do a fire safety walkthrough.


  • Conduct a fire safety walkthrough of your home on a regular basis. Use the following tips to help you in your walkthrough:


  • Keep clothes, blankets, curtains, towels, and other items that can easily catch on fire at least three feet from space heaters and away from stove burners.
  • Place space heaters where they will not tip over easily.
  • Have chimneys cleaned and inspected every year by a professional.
  • Always use a metal mesh screen with fireplaces and leave glass doors open while burning a fire.
  • Never leave cooking unattended.
  • Be sure your stove and small appliances are off before going to bed.
  • Check for worn wires and do not run cords under rugs or furniture.
  • Never overload electrical sockets.
  • Keep lighters and matches out of the reach of children.
  • Never leave cigarettes unattended and never smoke in bed.
  • Make sure cigarettes and ashes are out. The cigarette needs to be completely stubbed out in the ashtray or run under water.


Fire Extinguishers

  • USFA recommends that only those trained in the proper use and maintenance of fire extinguishers consider using them when appropriate.


  • The use of a fire extinguisher in the hands of a trained adult can be a life and property saving tool. However, a majority of adults have not had fire extinguisher training and may not know how and when to use them. Fire extinguisher use requires a sound decision making process and training on their proper use and maintenance.


Should I Use a Fire Extinguisher?


  • Consider the following three questions before purchasing or using a fire extinguisher to control a fire:


  • 1. What type of fire extinguisher is needed?


  • Different types of fires require different types of extinguishers. For example, a grease fire and an electrical fire require the use of different extinguishing agents to be effective and safely put the fire out.


  • Basically, there are five different types of extinguishing agents. Most fire extinguishers display symbols to show the kind of fire on which they are to be used.


  • Types of Fire Extinguishers


  • Class A extinguishers put out fires in ordinary combustible materials such as cloth, wood, rubber, paper, and many plastics.


  • Class B extinguishers are used on fires involving flammable liquids, such as grease, gasoline, oil, and oil-based paints.


  • Class C extinguishers are suitable for use on fires involving appliances, tools, or other equipment that is electrically energized or plugged in.


  • Class D extinguishers are designed for use on flammable metals and are often specific for the type of metal in question. These are typically found only in factories working with these metals.


  • Class K fire extinguishers are intended for use on fires that involve vegetable oils, animal oils, or fats in cooking appliances. These extinguishers are generally found in commercial kitchens, such as those found in restaurants, cafeterias, and caterers. Class K extinguishers are now finding their way into the residential market for use in kitchens.


  • There are also multi-purpose fire extinguishers - such as those labeled "B-C" or "A-B-C" - that can be used on two or more of the above type fires.


  • 2. Is the fire at a point where it might still be controlled by a fire extinguisher?


  • Portable fire extinguishers are valuable for immediate use on small fires. They contain a limited amount of extinguishing material and need to be properly used so that this material is not wasted. For example, when a pan initially catches fire, it may be safe to turn off the burner, place a lid on the pan, and use an extinguisher. By the time the fire has spread, however, these actions will not be adequate. Only trained firefighters can safely extinguish such fires.


Use a fire extinguisher only if:

  • You have alerted other occupants and someone has called the fire department;
  • The fire is small and contained to a single object, such as a wastebasket;
  • You are safe from the toxic smoke produced by the fire;
  • You have a means of escape identified and the fire is not between you and the escape route; and
  • Your instincts tell you that it is safe to use an extinguisher.


  • If all of these conditions are not present, you should NOT try to use a fire extinguisher. Alert other occupants, leave the building following your home escape plan, go to the agreed upon meeting place, and call the fire department from a cell phone or a neighbor's home.


Am I physically capable of using the extinguisher?

  • Some people have physical limitations that might diminish or eliminate their ability to properly use a fire extinguisher. People with disabilities, older adults, or children may find that an extinguisher is too heavy to handle or it may be too difficult for them to exert the necessary pressure to operate the extinguisher.


Maintenance

  • Fire extinguishers need to be regularly checked to ensure that:


  • The extinguisher is not blocked by furniture, doorways, or any thing that might limit access in an emergency.
  • The pressure is at the recommended level. Some extinguishers have gauges that indicate when the pressure is too high or too low.
  • All parts are operable and not damaged or restricted in any way. Make sure hoses and nozzles are free of insects or debris. There should not be any signs of damage or abuse, such as dents or rust, on the extinguisher.
  • The outside of the extinguisher is clean. Remove any oil or grease that might accumulate on the exterior.


  • Additionally:


  • Shake dry chemical extinguishers once a month to prevent the powder from settling or packing. Check the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • Pressure test the extinguisher (a process called hydrostatic testing) after a number of years to ensure that the cylinder is safe to use. Find out from the owner's manual, the label, or the manufacturer when an extinguisher may need this type of testing.
  • Immediately replace the extinguisher if it needs recharging or is damaged in any way.


Sound Decision Making. Training. Maintenance.

All are required to safely control a fire with an extinguisher. For this reason, USFA recommends that only those trained in the proper use and maintenance of fire extinguishers consider using them when appropriate. Contact your local fire department for information on training in your area.

FIRE SAFETY AWARENESS